Thoracic Facet Joint Pain

Thoracic Facet Joint Pain

Thoracic Facet Joint Pain

Thoracic Facet Arthropathy / Thoracic Facet Syndrome

What is Thoracic Facet Joint Pain?

thoracic facet joint pain syndrome

Thoracic facet joint pain is also commonly referred to as thoracic facet joint syndrome, facet joint disease, facet joint sprain, but mostly it is a pain caused by a facet joint injury.

Your facet joints are also known as zygapophyseal, apophyseal, or Z-joints. They are synovial joints between the vertebrae of your spine. There are two facet joints (left and right) in each spinal motion segment.

Biomechanically, the function of each pair of facet joints is to guide and limit the movement of that spinal motion segment. Each section of your spine has facet joints. You may hear them referred to as your cervical facet joints (neck), thoracic facet joints (mid-back) and lumbar facet joints (low back). Facet joint pain is one of the most common causes of neck pain, back pain and thoracic spine pain.

What Causes Thoracic Facet Joint Pain?

Facet joint motion can be disturbed by injury. Joint action can stiffen – known as hypomobility. Alternatively, joint movement can become excessive – known as hypermobility.

What Causes Thoracic Facet Joint Hypomobility?

Facet joint hypomobility can be caused by:

  • locked facet joint,
  • facet joint arthritis,
  • degenerative facet joint osteophytes (bone spurs),
  • joint capsule scarring, thickening or shortening, or
  • protective muscle spasm.

In other words, a facet joint can stiffen due to a slow degeneration or due to uncontrolled motion, which is where your local muscle strength is essential to stabilise and control your facet joints.

What Causes Thoracic Facet Joint Hypermobility?

Trauma usually causes hypermobility. Examples include:

  • Fracture,
  • Dislocation,
  • Overstretched ligaments, or
  • Any disease that destroys the joints, e.g. Rheumatoid Arthritis.

What Causes a Locked Thoracic Facet Joint?

Simple movements such as a mild twist, awkward movement, or just doing something your body didn’t expect (such as tripping) can lock a facet joint. In most cases, this is due to your facet joints motion exceeding your muscle control.

If you have previously suffered an injury or you have local muscle weakness supporting your facet joints, then it is even easier to repeated lock a facet joint.

What are the Symptoms of a Locked Thoracic Facet Joint?

Pain is one of the first symptoms a patient will notice with a facet joint injury. A thoracic facet joint injury will cause mid-back or ribcage pain and potentially pain referred around your chest wall.

When a facet joint locks, you may not be able to move in the direction away from where it’s locked. For example, if the joint is locked in a flexed forward position, you will probably have difficulty arching backwards. The opposite also occurs. In acute phases, muscle spasm will attempt to protect the injured facet joint.

The initial injury can sometimes occur days or occasionally weeks earlier. Your body will attempt to compensate for the locked joint by the neighbouring joints moving more than they usually would. This excessive movement can often cause pain on the opposite side to the locked facet joint and may potentially lead to other conditions such as sciatica or arm pain. Most commonly, you will notice decreased movement and pain or difficulty stretching.

People who have this problem recurrently are said to have thoracic facet joint syndrome. The most common cause of thoracic facet joint syndrome is weak stability muscles that are failing to control the movement of your spine.

How is a Thoracic Facet Joint Injury Diagnosed?

The most accurate diagnosis of a thoracic facet joint injury is via a hands-on examination from your spinal physiotherapist. Using their professional skills, they will confirm the specific facet joint problem and whether it is locked, stiff or unstable. Xrays, MRI’s and CT scan are used to identify arthritic changes and fractures but are unable to detect a locked facet joint.

Please consult your physiotherapist for specific advice regarding your thoracic facet joint pain management.

Thoracic Facet Joint Syndrome Treatment

The treatment for a locked facet joint is relatively simple. Your physiotherapist will quickly detect which facet joint is locked. Then proceed to unlock it. Usually, your physiotherapist will open a locked facet joint using a painless joint releasing technique.

The next step is to regain full motion and commence strengthening or other exercises to prevent a future, recurrence. Everyone is slightly different, so your treatment will vary depending on what deficits your physiotherapist has found during your examination.

Unstable Thoracic Facet Joint Treatment

Unstable or hypermobile facet joints need to be treated entirely differently to a locked facet joint. The fact that the joint already moves excessively would suggest that further joint loosening is unlikely to assist a hypermobile facet joint.

These patients respond better to muscle control and stabilization program. You physiotherapist will guide you.

Please check with your physiotherapist or doctor for their professional opinion.

Rib Joints

Thoracic facet joint syndrome can be complicated by rib joint dysfunction. Costvertebral and costotransverse joint dysfunction commonly presents. They can cause pain and ribcage stiffness.

What Results Can You Expect?

Physiotherapy will provide the majority of facet joint pain patients with complete relief. (Hu et al. 2006). Locked facet joints will usually start improving immediately post-unlocking. How they progress beyond that, depend on what other concomitant factors are present. How long has the joint been locked? What caused the locking? What adjacent joint motion there is available?

Based on your physiotherapist’s examination, they will be able to provide you with more strict guidelines. Facet joint instability will take longer to rehabilitate since they require time and practice for your muscle strengthening to occur. Once again, please check with your treating physiotherapist for their professional opinion and treatment plan.

Other Treatment Options

Massage

Massage can be an excellent form of muscle spasm relief to allow your facet joint spasm to release.

Acupuncture

Localized acupuncture or dry needling techniques can provide localized muscle spasm and facet pain relief. Ask your physiotherapist for more advice.

Thoracic Facet Joint Injections

Facet joint injections may confirm a diagnosis and provide short-term (a week or two) relief. Researchers have found that facet joint injections are less effective than patients who exercise in the long-term. (Mayer et al. 2004)

Radiofrequency

Radiofrequency in chronic cases which do not respond to physiotherapy treatment is an option. Radiofrequency cauterizes the nerve, providing pain relief for some time. The downside is that the pain returns typically when the nerve regrows within a few months.

Summary

Every case of facet joint pain is different. Please check with your physiotherapist for their professional opinion on what treatment plan is best for you.

FAQ’s about Facet Joint Pain

Nerve Pain

Nerve pain is pain that is caused by damage or disease that affects the nervous system of the body. It is also known as neuropathic pain or neuralgia. Nerve pain is a pain that comes from problems with signals from the nerves. It is different to the common type of pain that is due to an injury. This is known as nociceptive pain.

What Causes Nerve Pain?

nerve pain Neuropathic pain is caused by a problem with your nerves themselves, which sends pain messages to the brain.

What is Nerve Pain Symptoms?

Nerve pain is often described as burning, stabbing, shooting, aching, or like an electric shock.

What Causes Nerve Pain?

Various conditions can affect your nerves and cause nerve pain. Common sources of nerve pain include:
  • Shingles (post-herpetic neuralgia).
  • Trigeminal neuralgia.
  • Diabetic neuropathy.
  • Phantom limb pain following an amputation.
  • Cancer.
  • Multiple sclerosis.
  • Chemotherapy.
  • HIV infection.
  • Alcoholism.
  • Other nerve disorders.

Nerve Pain & Nociceptive Pain

You can suffer both nerve pain and nociceptive pain simultaneously. Both pain types can be caused by the same condition.

Nerve Pain Treatment

Nerve pain is less likely than nociceptive pain to be helped by traditional painkillers such as paracetamol, anti-inflammatories and codeine.  However, other types of medicines often work well to ease the pain. Nerve pain is often eased by anti-depressant or anti-epileptic medicines. Please ask your doctor for more advice.

Pain Links

Pain & Injury

Tens Machine

What is a TENS Machine?

Pins and Needles - Paraesthesia

What Causes Pins & Needles?

A moderately pinched nerve is the most common cause of "pins and needles". Pins and needles are referred to as "paraesthesia" in the medical community. Did you know that feeling "pins and needles" can be a worse sign than having pain in your arm or leg? The reason is that you can't even feel pain anymore when you significantly squash the nerve.

Even worse than "pins and needles" is "numbness" or "anaesthesia", which is a total lack of sensation. You will experience anaesthesia when there is severe nerve compression. Anaesthesia or numbness that persists for more than a few hours can be a sign of permanent nerve compression. Please seek prompt medical attention to prevent the nerve from permanent damage and the muscles it innervates to weaken drastically.

The majority of pinched nerves and nerve compressions are only transient and quickly reversed with early treatment. However, neglect can lead to permanent nerve compression injuries, which may never recover.

Common Causes of Pinched Nerves

The most common forms of nerve compression are in the spinal joints where either a disc bulge or a bony arthritic spur can irritate and compress the nerve. Compressions can also occur as the nerve passes through or around muscles. Your physiotherapist will know where to look.

How Can You Fix "Pins and Needles"?

If you know of someone who is experiencing chronic or permanent "pins and needles", "numbness" or "muscle weakness", please encourage them to seek urgent professional advice. The secret to quick success is the correct diagnosis. A highly trained health practitioner such as your physiotherapist or doctor is your best port of call.

More info

Youth Spinal Pain

Teenager Neck & Back Pain

teenager back pain Teenagers can be particularly vulnerable to back pain, mainly due to a combination of high flexibility and low muscle strength and posture control.  The competitive athlete and most individuals who exercise regularly or maintain a level of fitness and core stability control are less prone to spine injury and problems due to the strength and flexibility of supporting structures. Your physiotherapist can assist the resolution of any deficits in this area. Luckily, issues involving the lower lumbar spine are rare in athletes and account for less than 10% of sports-related injuries. Injuries do occur in contact sports and with repetitive strain sports. Sports such as gymnastics, cricket fast bowlers, and tennis have a higher incidence of associated lumbar spine problems related to repetitive twisting and hyper-bending motions. Spondylolisthesis is a significant concern and needs to be appropriately treated by a physiotherapist with a particular interest in these type of injuries. Luckily, most injuries are minor, self-limited, and respond quickly to physiotherapy treatment.

Common Adolescent Spinal Injuries

Lower Back (Lumbar Spine)

Midback (Thoracic Spine)

Neck (Cervical Spine)

Pelvis

For specific advice regarding youth neck or back pain, please seek the professional advice of your trusted spinal physiotherapist or doctor. Common Youth & Teenager Sports Injuries Common Youth Leg Injuries Common Youth Arm Injuries

Back Muscle Strains

Back muscle injuries are the most common form of back injury. Muscle fatigue, excessive loads or poor lifting postures are the most common problems. Inefficient back muscles can lead to poor joint stabilisation and subsequent injury. More info: Back Muscle Pain

Ligament Sprains

Ligaments are the strong fibrous bands that limit the amount of movement available at each spinal level. Stretching ligaments too far or too quickly will tear them with subsequent bleeding into the surrounding tissues, causing swelling and pain. Awkward lifting, sports injuries, and motor vehicle accidents are very common causes. Just as in other regions of the body, physiotherapy hastens ligament healing and relieves pain so that you can enjoy life again as soon as possible. More info: Back Ligament Sprains

Bulging Discs

A bulging disc injury is a common spine injury sustained to your spine's intervertebral disc. Spinal discs are the shock-absorbing rings of fibrocartilage and glycoprotein that separate your bony vertebral bodies while allowing movement at each spinal level, and enough room for the major spinal nerves to exit from the spinal canal and travel to your limbs. The annulus is the outer section of the spinal disc, consisting of several layers of multi-directional fibrocartilaginous fibres all densely packed to create a wall around the glycoprotein filled jelly-like disc nucleus. A disc bulge (commonly referred to as a slipped disc), can potentially press against or irritate the nerve where it exits from the spine. This nerve pinch can cause back pain, spasms, cramping, numbness, pins and needles, or pain in your legs. More info: Bulging Discs

Bone Injuries

You can also fracture your spine if the force involved is highly traumatic or you have a low bone density (e.g. osteoporosis). More info: Osteoporosis

Poor Posture

Poor posture when sitting, standing or lifting at work can place unnecessary stress on your spine. Muscles fatigue, ligaments overstretch, discs stretch and this places spinal joints and nerves under pain-causing pressure. More info: Poor Posture

What Can Cause Severe Low Back Pain?

A sudden injury most often causes acute low back pain. The most common injury sources are the muscles and ligaments supporting the back. The pain may be caused by muscle spasms or a strain or tear in the muscles and ligaments. But occasionally, it can have a more sinister cause.

Warning Signs of a More Serious Back Injury?

In these instances of neurological deficit, please urgently consult your nearest hospital, doctor or physiotherapist. The following neurological signs warrant prompt assessment:
  • pins and needles (paraesthesia),
  • numbness (anaesthesia),
  • leg muscle weakness,
  • altered reflexes,
  • difficulty walking,
  • loss of control of bladder or bowels.

Non-Musculoskeletal Causes of Low Back Pain

Although most low back pain is musculoskeletal in origin, other health conditions can cause low back pain.
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm
  • Infection of the spine (osteomyelitis, discitis)
  • Kidney infection or kidney stones
  • Spondyloarthropathies: e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis.
  • Female reproductive organs: e.g. pregnancy complications, ovarian cysts or cancer, endometriosis
Please seek the professional advice of your trusted and experienced healthcare practitioner to diagnose the cause of your lower back pain.

What Causes Lower Back Pain?

Researchers and spinal health care practitioners categorise lower back bain into the following categories: 1. Specific Spinal Pathologies  (<1%) 2. Radicular Syndromes (5-10%) 3. Non-Specific Lower Back Pain (NSLBP) (Bardin et al., 2017)

Specific Spinal Pathologies

Some conditions that cause back pain do require an urgent and specific referral and treatment. These conditions include: These conditions do require early diagnosis and prompt referral to the appropriate medical specialist.  Luckily these conditions account for less than 1% of back pain sufferers, but you don't want them missed. Some referrals should be IMMEDIATE!

Radicular Syndromes

Lower back pain can result from structural damage that can irritate or pinch a nerve. Researchers believe that radicular syndrome causes 5-10% of back pain presentations to general practitioners.

Radicular pain (e.g. sciatica)

The most common pinched nerve in the lower back is your sciatic nerve. You may be diagnosed with sciatica if you are suffering radicular pain down your leg due to a back injury. While the sciatic nerve is the most common nerve that can be affected by a spinal injury, you can modify any spinal nerve function (e.g. femoral nerve). The following back injuries may cause radicular pain: Pain is due to swelling or space-occupying material adjacent to the spinal nerve. The affected nerve may be irritated, resulting in radicular pain. Or, even worse, become pinched or compressed, resulting in radiculopathy.

Radiculopathy

Lumbar radiculopathy can result in functionally disabling conditions such as foot drop, foot slap or eversion muscle weakness that can affect your ability to walk.

Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is a slightly different condition and relates to the narrowing of the spinal canal. Spinal stenosis is usually more prevalent as you age.

Non-Specific Lower Back Pain (NSLBP)

Non-Specific Lower Back Pain (NSLBP) is the diagnostic term used to classify lower back pain sufferers with no specific structure injured. It is a diagnosis of exclusion. In other words, your spinal health care practitioner has excluded specific spinal pathologies and any of the radicular syndromes mentioned above as the cause of your back pain or symptoms. Fortunately, these conditions account for approximately 90-95% of lower back pain and can nearly always successfully rehabilitate without the need for surgery. Most improve within two to six weeks. They can be fast-tracked with pain relief and physiotherapy techniques such as manual therapy and back exercises.

NSLBP Causes

The causes of NSLBP are numerous but roughly fall into either a sudden (traumatic) or sustained overstress injuries. Most people can relate to traumatic injury such as bending awkwardly to lift a heavy load that tears or damages structures. However, sustained overstress injuries (e.g. poor posture) are probably more common and more straightforward to prevent. In these cases, positional stress or postural fatigue creates an accumulated microtrauma that overloads your lower back structures over an extended period to cause injury and back pain. Most commonly, NSLBP causes include back muscle strain or back ligament sprain. Other chronic back conditions such as degenerative disc disease may underly your acute disc health and predispose you to the severe pain. The good news is that you can take measures to prevent or lessen most back pain episodes. Early diagnosis and specific individualised treatment are the easiest way to recover quickly from lower back pain and prevent a recurrence.

What is Back Muscle Pain?

Back muscle pain or its aliases: pulled back muscle, back muscle spasm, torn back muscle or back muscle strain, is very common. Back muscle pain is the most common source of back pain. The good news is that it is also one of the quickest to heal and rehabilitate.

What Causes Back Muscle Pain?

Most causes of low back pain are muscle, ligament or joint-related. Commonly, these muscular strains, ligament sprains and joint dysfunction arises suddenly during or following physical loading of your spine. Muscle fatigue, excessive loads, high speeds or poor lifting postures are the most common causes. The causes of pure back pain are numerous but roughly fall into the following categories.

Back Muscle Strains

Muscle pain is the most common source of back pain. Muscle fatigue, excessive loads or poor lifting or sitting postures are the most common problems. Inefficient, weak, or back muscles that lack endurance or normal contraction timing can lead to reduced joint stabilisation and subsequent injury to your back muscles, ligaments, joints or even spinal discs.

Poor Posture

Poor posture, when sitting, standing and lifting at work, can place unnecessary stress upon your spine. With muscle fatigue or overstretching, your ligaments and discs can stretch, and this puts spinal joint muscles and nerves under pain-causing pressure or strain, that results in back pain.

Ligament Sprains

Ligaments are the durable, fibrous bands that limit the amount of movement available at each spinal level. Stretching ligaments too far or too quickly will tear them with subsequent bleeding into the surrounding tissues, causing swelling, muscular spasm and pain. Awkward lifting, sports injuries and motor vehicle accidents are prevalent causes. Just as in other regions of the body, physiotherapy hastens ligament healing and relieves pain so that you can enjoy life again as soon as possible.

What are the Symptoms of Back Muscle Pain?

Back muscle pain symptoms may range from a mild ache to sudden debilitating back pain. Typical back muscle pain symptoms include:
  • Localised back pain, with no radiation into your buttock or leg.
  • Back muscle tenderness and spasm.
  • Protective back stiffness.
  • Sudden back pain onset.
You will usually feel better when resting and may find a change of position painful, e.g. sit to stand, rolling in bed, walking or bending.

How is Back Muscle Pain Diagnosed?

Differentiating a back muscle strain from a ligament sprain can be difficult, as both injuries will show similar symptoms. In general, it doesn't significantly matter what you call the problem because the treatment and prognosis for both back muscular strains and ligament sprains are similar. Most spinal practitioners refer to both injuries as a category called a "Back Strain" or "Musculoligamentous Strain". X-rays and CT scans do not identify muscle or ligament injury. MRI scan is probably the best diagnostic test to determine the muscle or ligament structures injured.

What is Back Muscle Pain Treatment?

Seek a Professional Diagnosis!

A spinal healthcare practitioner, such as your physiotherapist, should thoroughly; examine you to exclude more severe sources of back pain. Numerous injuries can cause back pain, and the treatment does vary significantly depending on your diagnosis. Physiotherapy treatment aims to protect your damaged tissue while hastening your muscle and ligament healing and then look at strategies to prevent a recurrence. Your physiotherapist has some nifty tricks for quickly relieving your back pain so that you can enjoy life again as soon as possible.

Back Strain Causes

We do know that some people are vulnerable to repeated lower back sprains and strains. While it is easier to understand that lifting a heavy load in an awkward position can cause back pain, it's harder to comprehend how a simple movement can hurt your back. Yes, it can happen by merely leaning forwards to pick up your teacup or when bending to brush your teeth! The reason is poor local joint control. The main reason for this is inadequate or non-existent muscle activation of the deep core stability muscles. These muscles are small but are right next to the joint to control excessive slides and glides. When they don't work correctly, the joint can slide too far and strain its supporting ligaments. Ouch! That hurts. The good news is poor core stability can be easily corrected to prevent back pain. Please contact your physio for more information or to have your core activation accurately assessed. High-risk factors of back pain include:
  • sudden forceful movement
  • lifting a heavy object
  • twisting the back
  • coughing or sneezing
  • prolonged sitting with poor posture
More information about Back Pain More information about Deep Core Stability

What is Physiotherapy Treatment?

Physiotherapists help people affected by illness, injury or disability through exercise, manual joint therapy, soft tissue techniques education and advice.  Physiotherapists maintain physical health, allow patients to manage pain and prevent disease for people of all ages. Physiotherapists help encourage pain-relief, injury recovery, enabling people to stay playing a sport, working or performing daily living activities while assisting them to remain functionally independent.

There is a multitude of different physiotherapy treatment approaches.

Acute & Sub-Acute Injury Management

Hands-On Physiotherapy Techniques

physiotherapy treatment

Your physiotherapist's training includes hands-on physiotherapy techniques such as:

Your physiotherapist has skilled training. Physiotherapy techniques have expanded over the past few decades. They have researched, upskilled and educated themselves in a spectrum of allied health skills. These skills include techniques shared with other healthcare practitioners. Professions include exercise physiologists, remedial massage therapists, osteopaths, acupuncturists, kinesiologists, chiropractors and occupational therapists, to name a few.

Physiotherapy Taping

Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled professional who utilises strapping and taping techniques to prevent and assist injuries or pain relief and function.

Alternatively, your physiotherapist may recommend a supportive brace.

Acupuncture and Dry Needling

Many physiotherapists have acquired additional training in acupuncture and dry needling to assist pain relief and muscle function.

Physiotherapy Exercises

Physiotherapists have been trained in the use of exercise therapy to strengthen your muscles and improve your function. Physiotherapy exercises use evidence-based protocols where possible as an effective way that you can solve or prevent pain and injury. Your physiotherapist is highly-skilled in the prescription of the "best exercises" for you and the most appropriate "exercise dose" for you, depending on your rehabilitation status. Your physiotherapist will incorporate essential components of pilates, yoga and exercise physiology to provide you with the best result. They may even use Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy so that you can watch your muscles contract on a screen as you correctly retrain them.

Biomechanical Analysis

Biomechanical assessment, observation and diagnostic skills are paramount to the best treatment. Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled health professional. They possess superb diagnostic skills to detect and ultimately avoid musculoskeletal and sports injuries. Poor technique or posture is one of the most common sources of a repeat injury.

Hydrotherapy

Aquatic water exercises are an effective method to provide low bodyweight exercises.

Sports Physiotherapy

Sports physio requires an extra level of knowledge and physiotherapy to assist injury recovery, prevent injury and improve performance. For the best advice, consult a Sports Physiotherapist.

Vestibular Physiotherapy

Women's Health

Women's Health Physiotherapy is a particular interest group of therapies.

Workplace Physiotherapy

Not only can your physiotherapist assist you in sport, but they can also help you at work. Ergonomics looks at the best postures and workstation set up for your body at work or home. Whether it be lifting technique improvement, education programs or workstation setups, your physiotherapist can help you.

Electrotherapy

Plus Much More

Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled body mechanic. A physiotherapist has particular interests in certain injuries or specific conditions. For advice regarding your problem, please contact your PhysioWorks team.

What is Therapeutic Ultrasound?

Therapeutic ultrasound is an electrotherapy modality which has been used by physiotherapists since the 1940s. Via an ultrasound probe through a transmission coupling gel in direct contact with your skin, ultrasound waves are applied. ultrasound Therapeutic ultrasound may increase:
  • healing rates
  • tissue heating
  • local blood flow
  • tissue relaxation
  • scar tissue breakdown.

How Could Ultrasound Help?

Ultrasound increases local blood flow. This increase may help to reduce local swelling and promote soft tissue healing rates. A higher power density may soften scar tissue.

Specific Ultrasound Uses

Mastitis or blocked milk ducts successfully respond to therapeutic ultrasound. The effect is quite dramatic, with improvement within 24 to 72 hours. The most common conditions treated with ultrasound include soft tissue injuries such as muscle, ligament injuries or some tendinopathies. Phonophoresis uses ultrasound in a non-invasive way of administering medications to tissues below the skin. This method may assist patients who are uncomfortable with injections. With phonophoresis, the ultrasonic energy forces the drug through the skin.

What is an Ultrasound Dose?

A typical ultrasound treatment will take from 3-10 minutes. Where scar tissue breakdown is the goal, this treatment time could be much longer. During the procedure, the head of the ultrasound probe is in constant motion. If kept in continuous motion, the patient should feel no discomfort at all. Some conditions treated with ultrasound include soft tissues injuries such as muscles or ligament injuries, tendinopathy, non-acute joint swelling and muscle spasm.

How Does an Ultrasound Work?

A piezoelectric effect, caused by the vibration of crystals within the ultrasound head of the probe creates the sound waves. The ultrasound waves generated then pass through the skin cause a vibration of the local soft tissues. This repeated cavitation can cause a deep heating locally though usually no sensation of heat will be felt by the patient. In situations where a heating effect is not desirable, an athermal application occurs. Athermal doses are typical during acute fresh injury and the associated acute inflammation.

When Should Ultrasound be Avoided?

Contraindications of ultrasound include:
  • local malignancy,
  • over metal implants,
  • local acute infection,
  • vascular abnormalities,
  • active epiphyseal regions (growth plates) in children,
  • over the spinal cord in the area of a laminectomy,
  • over the eyes, skull, or testes
  • and, directly on the abdomen of pregnant women. Treatment ultrasound differs from diagnostic ultrasound!
Like all medical equipment, when used by highly trained professionals, such as your physiotherapist, therapeutic ultrasound is very unlikely to cause any adverse effects. Please consult your physiotherapist for their opinion on whether therapeutic ultrasound could assist your injury. Therapeutic Ultrasound differs from Real-Time Ultrasound Treatment.

Ultrasound Physiotherapy Could Help You Beat Back Pain

Researchers have found that ultrasound physiotherapy has a 70% success rate of preventing a return of lower back pain within 12 months. The same study showed that those patients who didn't undergo the ultrasound physiotherapy had only a 16% chance of remaining pain-free. This finding means your chance of avoiding repeat back pain is 4.4 times better with ultrasound physiotherapy! Plus, there's even more good news. Researchers have discovered that 65% of sufferers didn't have another bout of pain within three years after undertaking ultrasound physiotherapy. This low recurrence rate means the ultrasound physiotherapy intervention also endures the test of time.

Brisbane Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy Clinics

At PhysioWorks, we believe that cutting edge technology and treatment techniques deliver the best results for you. We welcome clients who are currently attending other spinal health practitioners without ultrasound-guided rehabilitation. We are happy to work with you and your spinal health practitioner to solve your back pain as quickly and effectively as possible. PhysioWorks has several real-time ultrasound physiotherapy clinics in Brisbane. The diagnostic ultrasound equipment is expensive, so only a handful of physiotherapy clinics offer this premium service. Allow up to 45-60 minutes for your initial scan, including assessment, corrective exercises and treatment. Please contact one of the following PhysioWorks clinics that provide Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy programs to make your booking.

Book Online 24/7:

Ashgrove Ph 3366 4221     Clayfield Ph 3862 4544     Sandgate Ph 3269 1122

Lower Back Pain Treatment Guidelines?

While lower back pain treatment will vary depending on your specific diagnosis, your physiotherapist will have the following aims.

PHASE I - Back Pain Relief & Protection

Managing your back pain is the main reason that you seek treatment for lower back pain. In truth, it was the final symptom that you developed and should be the first symptom to improve. Your physiotherapist will use an array of treatment tools to reduce your pain and inflammation. These include ice, electrotherapy, acupuncture, de-loading taping techniques, soft tissue massage. A course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen may also help in this phase.

PHASE II - Restoring Normal ROM and Strength. Early Back Exercises.

As your lower back pain and inflammation settles, your lower back pain may feel better. Still, you are more vulnerable to re-injury during this honeymoon period when you don't have pain, but your muscles and ligaments are weak. During this phase, your physiotherapist will turn their attention to restoring your normal lumbar spine motion. Plus they'll assess your muscle length and resting tension, muscle strength and endurance, proprioception, balance and gait (walking pattern). Your physiotherapist may commence you on a lower abdominal core stability program to facilitate your important muscles that dynamically control and stabilise your lower back and pelvis. Your physiotherapist will assess your muscle recruitment pattern and prescribe the best back exercises for your specific needs.

PHASE III - Restoring Full Function

Depending on your chosen work, sport or activities, your physiotherapist will aim to restore your back's function to allow you to return to your desired activities safely. Everyone has different demands for their lower back that will determine what specific treatment goals you need to achieve. For some, it is merely to walk around the block. Others may wish to run a marathon or be a fast bowler. Your physiotherapist will tailor your back pain rehabilitation to help you achieve your own functional goals.

PHASE IV - Back Exercises - Preventing a Recurrence

Recurrence of lower back pain can occur. The main reason for a recurrence is due to insufficient rehabilitation. In particular, poor compliance with deep abdominal core muscle exercises. You should continue a version of these back exercises routinely a few times per week. Your physiotherapist will assist you in identifying the best activities for you to continue indefinitely.

Suffering Back Pain. What Should You Do?

While lower back pain is commonplace, the diagnosis of the cause of your back pain is specific to you, and therefore, the treatment or investigation pathway varies for each case. A spinal health care professional can assist you with a prompt diagnosis, early referral, acute and chronic back pain relief, plus long-term self-management or back pain prevention strategies specific to you. You should feel confident that your practitioner has screened you particular pathologies that require urgent medical attention. They should assess you for neurological deficits such as:
  • loss of bowel or bladder function,
  • leg muscle weakness,
  • loss of sensation,
  • diminished reflexes,
  • and, day-to-day function.
A thorough assessment will determine whether you have radiculopathy or stenosis. This diagnosis is essential since treatment usually differs from NSLBP or radicular pain. For specific recommendations, please consult a musculoskeletal physiotherapist or another spinal healthcare practitioner. You probably already know that back pain has a nasty habit of returning within a few months of the initial injury. Research has shown that you have an 80% chance of recurring back pain within 12 months of the first episode.  The good news is that you can reduce your chances significantly if you do the right thing early.

What Should You Do When You Suffer Back Pain?

Rest?

The latest research recommends that you only spend a day or two resting in bed. More extended periods cause muscle weakness which ultimately makes repeat back pain more likely.

Ice or Heat?

We recommend ice treatment for 20 minutes every 2 or 3 hours for the first 48 hours. The ice should help reduce your pain, swelling and back spasms. After a few days, you are safe to use heat packs. We usually recommend avoiding heat (and heat rubs) in the first 48 hours. Heat packs encourage bleeding, which could be detrimental if used too early.

Should You Use a Back Brace?

A back brace can help you to get back on your feet or allow you to return to work sooner. We don't encourage long-term use because research has shown that your stomach and back muscles will weaken as you become reliant on the brace.

What Medication Should You Use?

Your Doctor or Pharmacist may recommend pain relief in the form of paracetamol or an anti-inflammatory.  You are best seeking their advice as certain drugs can interfere with other health conditions.

When Should You Commence Physio?

In severe cases, when the slightest movement causes unbelievable pain or spasm, it may be best to wait a day or two to start treatment. This delay will allow the majority of swelling to settle.  Slight niggles or "my back feels out" sufferers can usually commence treatment (and maybe fixed) on the day of injury.  If you are not sure what to do, please call us for advice. We'll happily guide you in your time of need.

What About Core Stability Training?

The current trend in physiotherapy and fitness training is 'core stability training' (back and abdominal muscle control).

What If You Do Nothing?

Research tells us that symptoms lasting longer than three months become habitual and are much harder to solve. The sooner you get on top of your symptoms, the better your outcome and the quicker you'll get back to living your life. "Back pain is something you could be suffering needlessly".

What Results Should You Expect from Physiotherapy?

Not only will your physio diagnose the cause of your pain and give you the "peace of mind" associated, but they'll also help you to:
  • Relieve your pain quicker
  • Cope better with your pain using proven strategies and tips
  • Get you back to work and play quicker through faster healing rates.
  • Loosen and strengthen your back with individually prescribed exercises
  • Prevent future bouts of back pain via our holistic back pain management approach
Think about it. Back Pain is Something You Could be Suffering Needlessly. Please use our expert advice to guide you out of pain quicker and for a lot longer. If you have any questions regarding your back pain (or any other condition), please call us now to discuss your situation. You'll find our friendly staff happy to point you in the right direction.

Core Exercises

While all back exercises that strengthen the muscles that traverse your back are essential, back pain researchers have emphasised retraining your deep core muscles as a priority. "Core Stability" is your body's ability to control and support your spine via specific muscles dynamically. Your spine is an inherently unstable area of your body. Your lower back has five vertebrae that allow twisting, bending and arching with no other bones to assist. They sit on top of a triangular bone called the sacrum, which wedges itself into the pelvis. Unfortunately, without strong support, all of these bones would fall in a heap on the ground. Your deep core muscles are the main structures that support, control and move your lower spine and pelvis. They are also the most energy-efficient and best-positioned muscles to do the job for 24 hours a day. However, when they turn off, your spine is not fully supported by its usual muscular corset. This lack of support makes it quite vulnerable to injury and chronic pain. Research has shown that our back pain causes your "deep core stability" muscles to STOP working in EVERY case. The first time you experience low back pain, your brain automatically inhibits the Transversus Abdominis (TA) muscle's regular activity. This inhibition occurs in 100% of sufferers. Unfortunately, even once the back pain has eased the TA muscle does not automatically switch on again. Inhibition of the TA muscle exposes your spine to further trauma and hence "recurrent back pain". Each incident becomes a little more severe, and consequently, further wasting of the TA occurs. Other causes of muscle inhibition include previous abdominal surgery, pelvic pain and post-pregnancy.

What are the Benefits of Core Stability Training?

Researchers have shown that the correct use of your core stability muscles not only prevents pain but also alleviates pain if you're already suffering. Also, your body's strength, power, endurance and performance will improve. You'll be able to run faster, jump higher and even throw further when these muscles work correctly. For more information, please contact your PhysioWorks physiotherapist.

Core Stability Muscles

The deep core stability muscles of the lower spine include:
  • Transversus Abdominis (TA)
  • Multifidus (MF)
  • Pelvic Floor (PF)

Transversus Abdominis

core-stability-muscles The Transversus Abdominis (TA) is the deepest abdominal muscle. It is the "corset muscle" of the spine and pelvis. In the typical situation, TA contracts in anticipation of body motion to guard the spinal joints, ligaments, discs and nerves.

Multifidus

Multifidus (MF) muscles are very short muscles running from the transverse processes (on the sides) of one vertebra up to the spinous process (the middle of the back) of the next vertebra upwards. Their primary function is back stability. They do not produce an extensive range of movement, but work to provide small, "fine-tuning" postural changes, all day long.

Pelvic Floor & Diaphragm

The TA and the MF work in conjunction with your pelvic floor and diaphragm to make a flexible but stable region around your lumbar spine. This ability to stabilise your lumbar spine in its many positions enables you to overcome back problems and reduce your reoccurrence chances.

What Are The Ideal Core Exercises?

Your deep core stability muscles retraining uses specific low-level activation exercises. While a very skilled physiotherapist who has training in deep core activation can observe and palpate for the correct muscle contraction, the best way is to see them working on a real-time ultrasound scan. Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy guidance allows you to see how your muscles are contracting in real-time. This visual feedback will enable you to correct your specific deep core muscles inside your stomach, lower back, and pelvic floor as you attempt to contract those muscles.

Beware of “Core Stability” Exercises!

The fitness industry is full of fitness instructors who profess to know how to activate your core stability muscles. Unfortunately, the wrong core exercises will do you harm. Most progress your core exercises far too quickly and bypass these critical muscles to further strengthen your outer abdominal muscles and leave your deep core muscles weak. Research evidence has found that this renders you vulnerable to lower back pain and injury.

Article by P.Xu

As we slowly start getting into the cooler seasons, many people will begin to notice sore joints waking up in the morning, or that movement has become stiff, or even headaches increasing in frequency or severity. Why is this? It turns out that cold weather can have a significant impact on your body’s tissues. Notably, the connective tissue gives our muscles and joints the ability to move as they do, called elastin. As the name suggests, elastin is one of the critical components that provide our joints and muscles with the ability to bend, stretch, and move as they need to get you through the day.
Now, imagine putting a rubber band in the freezer for a few hours. You take it out and then stretch it as hard as you can without warming it up. It’s either not going to stretch as well as it should or break in two. Elastin shares these properties. Under cold temperatures, the tissue cannot stretch or bend as well as it is supposed to, causing stiffness or soreness. Coupled with a few other common changes in the cold, vasoconstriction causes a decrease in your blood circulation. Plus, the tendency to stay home and not move our body makes many of us unaccustomed to cooler temperatures feel the full brunt of these effects moving forward. The good news is, it’s a relatively easy fix. Stay warm. If you’re planning on exercising, make sure to perform a dynamic warm-up to decrease the risk of injury, rather than pushing a cold muscle past its limit (remember the rubber band). If a joint feels stiff in the morning, remedy this with a heat pack or a hot shower. If you suspect your headache cause is the cold, slap on a beanie. This head-warming has the added benefit of hiding a bad hair day. Another excellent fix is getting a massage. Soft tissue therapy such as massage excels at combating several things caused by the cold. The physical act of heating a muscle or joint with friction provides warmth to deep tissues that a heat pack may not reach, allowing the elastin to function as it should. Trigger point work into deep muscle fibres may also bring longer-lasting relief than superficial heat therapy or static stretching. If you’re prone to feeling the cold effects, massage therapy may be the fix that you have been looking for if you want to achieve long-lasting relief from stiff or sore joints and muscles this winter.

What is the PhysioWorks Difference?

You'll be impressed with the experienced physiotherapists, massage therapists and reception staff who represent PhysioWorks.  To ensure that we remain highly qualified, we are committed to participating in continuing education to provide optimal care. If you've been searching for health practitioners with a serious interest in your rehabilitation or injury prevention program, our staff have either participated or are still participating in competitive sports at a representative level. We also currently provide physiotherapy and massage services for numerous sports clubs. Our experience helps us understand what you need to do to safely and quickly return to youryouryour sporting field, home duties, or employment.

How You'll Benefit from the PhysioWorks Difference?

At PhysioWorks physiotherapy and massage clinics, we strive to offer our clients quickeffective and long-lasting results by providing high-quality treatment. We aim to get you better quicker in a friendly and caring environment conducive to successful healing. With many years of clinical experience, our friendly service and quality treatment is a benchmark not only in Brisbane but Australia-wide.

What are Some of the BIG Differences?

Our therapists pride themselves on keeping up to date with the latest research and treatment skills to ensure that they provide you with the most advantageous treatment methods. They are continually updating their knowledge via seminars, conferences, workshops, scientific journals etc. Not only will you receive a detailed consultation, but we offer long-term solutions, not just quick fixes that in reality, only last for a short time. We attempt to treat the cause, not just the symptoms. PhysioWorks clinics are modern thinking. Not only in their appearance but in the equipment we use and in our therapists' knowledge. Our staff care about you!  We are always willing to go that 'extra mile' to guarantee that we cater to our clients' unique needs. All in all, we feel that your chances of the correct diagnosis, the most effective treatment and the best outcomes are all the better at PhysioWorks.

Core Stability vs Pilates

The whole 'core stability' phenomenon started back in the 1920s with a chap named Joseph Pilates, who's exercise regimes have become quite trendy in the last ten years. Pilates talked about developing a 'girdle of strength' by learning to recruit the deep-trunk muscles. Even without complete knowledge of anatomy and the benefits of the latest muscle activity research, he was aware of these deep muscles' importance and their supportive effects. Core stability training targets explicitly the smaller and deeper back and stomach muscles. Once recruited, these muscles control the position of the spine during dynamic movements of your body.

Is Pilates for Everyone?

Sadly, No! Exercise programs that aim to develop your deep core strength can often do just the opposite. The most common reason for injury and back pain is the incorrect timing of core muscle recruitment.  Pilates, Yoga, gym strengthening, and other exercise forms place high demands on your core stability system. Abnormal core muscle recruitment order increases your injury chance proportion with the exercise difficulty. Remember, if you build a tower on a weak foundation, it will eventually topple. Look what happened to the Leaning Tower of Pisa. It's got lousy core stability! The same goes for your core stability muscles. However, recruiting the deeper core muscles before your superficial layers, just like adding floors to a sturdy skyscraper and your back, will forever be healthy and pain-free.

Why is it Important to Specially Retrain your Core Stability Muscles?

Once the core muscles become weak, and their timing is incorrect, you can experience prolonged back pain and are at much higher risk of re-occurrence. Research has identified that the order of core muscle recruitment is one of the most critical factors in the prevention or resolution of pain.  Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy has proven particularly useful to correct the muscle recruitment order. To solve your back pain and to reduce your re-injury risk, you must retrain these muscles back to an appropriate level for your needs. If you are relatively sedentary, you may only need a low level of control, however, if you are a high-level sportsperson or a manual worker you will need to work up to a much higher core strength level.

What Should You Expect?

In the initial stage, you need to consciously activate these muscles and incorporate them into an exercise program. A lot of people find it difficult to isolate these muscles and need help to be able to activate them effectively. Research has discovered that real-time ultrasound-guided treatment is the most effective way to successfully retrain an isolated and well-timed core stability contraction.

More information

Pilates is available at some of our PhysioWorks clinics.
Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy is available at some of our PhysioWorks clinics.

What Causes Recurring Back Pain

If you suffer back pain, you’ll know that it has a nasty habit of returning. Not only is it painful, but it can interfere with your work, sport or just everyday life. Acute back pain usually settles with conventional spinal treatment. However, the recurrence rate is too high. There’s an 84% chance of recurrence within one year! (Hides et al. 2001)

Why Does My Back Pain Come and Go?

Researchers discovered that a couple of deep muscles in your abdomen and lower back need to contract to support your spine. When they work correctly, you’re much less likely to suffer back pain. The bad news is that these muscles turn off every time you suffer back pain and don’t automatically turn on again. This muscle inhibition leaves your back at risk of injury. However, the good news is that you can quickly retrain these deep muscles in your abdomen, and lower back. The most effective retraining method is via real-time ultrasound. The chance of lower back pain (LBP) recurrence within one year reduces significantly.

Back & Neck Pain Prevention Tips

Here's some beneficial advice to help you prevent back pain and enjoy life to the maximum.

Posture

I'm afraid that your mother was right. If you slouch, you'll end up with problems. Just one of those problems is back pain. You'll find other problems elsewhere on this website. Think "Grow Tall".  Imagine that you have a string screwed onto the back of your head, just above your hairline. Then think that someone is dragging you up off the chair you are sitting on. Hold this "grow tall" position for 10 seconds and repeat every half hour. As well as greatly reducing your chances of back pain you'll note that your chest has lifted, shoulders are relaxed, the chin is tucked in, the head is level and stomach muscles have contracted.  Not bad for such a simple exercise. This posture can be repeated in sitting, standing, sleeping, walking or running. Try it, and the physio will work for you too!

Lifting

The best method to avoid back pain from lifting is delegation. If this isn't an option for you, try the following:
  • Use back support to lift loads over 15 to 20kg.
  • Bend at the hips and knees with your feet shoulder-width apart.
  • Firmly grip the load and hold it close to your body.
  • Think "grow tall" to tighten your stomach muscles and look upwards to straighten your back.
  • Stand using your strong thigh and buttock muscles to lift.
  • Once upright, turn by using your feet. Avoid twisting your back.

Sitting

Use the "grow tall" principle each 15 to 30 minutes while sitting. A supportive chair or lower back cushion is essential if you must sit. If possible, don't stay seated for too long. Regularly stand up, stretch your back and walk short distances for a variety of posture. After all, we were designed for hunting and foraging - not sit in front of a computer!

Exercise

Fitness has many benefits. Stronger, more flexible muscles and less weight to stress the bones and discs. PhysioWorks specialises in the provision of exercise programs to keep your back flexible, strong and pain-free. Exercise can involve aspects of flexibility, strengthening and postural control. Consider Real-Time Ultrasound Retraining to ensure you are doing it right!

Sleeping

A quality pillow and mattress are necessary for a healthy spine. You do spend somewhere between one-quarter (1/4) and one-third (1/3) of your life sleeping. Do it in comfort!  You'll need to consider a new mattress if you wake up through the night or in the morning with back pain.  Please ask your PhysioWorks therapist for advice at your next visit.

Driving

Use the "grow tall" principle each 15 to 30 minutes while driving. The combination of sitting and bumpy roads is a recipe for back pain. A  lower back cushion is essential if you must drive any distance. If possible, don't stay seated for too long. Regularly break your travels to have a walk and perform simple stretching exercises for a variety of posture and a healthy spine. After all, we were designed for hunting and foraging - not sit in front of a computer!

Smoking Effect on Lower Back Pain

It's more bad news for smokers. A new study strengthens the link between smoking and lower back pain. It also sheds light on the causes of degenerative lumbar spine problems. Numerous researchers have proposed a link between smoking and low back pain, but the exact nature of that link had remained largely untested in long-term studies. The new study on smoking and low back pain, which examined 1,337 doctors, followed some participants for more than 50 years.

Research Findings

Researchers discovered that smoking history, high blood pressure, and heart disease - all of which are risk factors for narrowing the arteries - significantly increased the likelihood of low back pain. These same risk factors and high cholesterol levels were also significantly associated with lumbar spondylosis development (degeneration).

Why?

These findings support the theory that the arteries' narrowing may cause lower back pain and degenerative disorders of the intervertebral discs.  Researchers have suggested that damage to the discs and joints' vascular structures (blood supply) is the injury mechanism in low back pain.

Conclusions from Smoking and Low Back Pain Study

The study concluded that the development of lower back pain was significantly associated with smoking history and high blood pressure. The development of lumbar spondylosis was significantly associated with smoking history, and high blood pressure and cholesterol.

What about Diabetes and Lower Back Pain?

The good news for people with diabetes was that diabetes did not increase the incidence of lower back pain or lumbar spondylosis (degeneration).

Lower Back Pain Research

Lower back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions in health care. It is suggested that 80% of the population will suffer low back pain at some point in their lives. Lower back pain costs our country billions of dollars every year through absenteeism and injury rehabilitation. It is critical to all those who suffer from low back pain that a safe and effective treatment protocol can beat lower back pain. Australian physiotherapists lead the world with groundbreaking research to improve the treatment and prevention of low back pain. At PhysioWorks, we are glad to offer both immediate pain-relieving techniques and longer-term preventative programs to stop recurring lower back pain.

How Can PhysioWorks Help Your Lower Back Pain?

Well-designed research and highly skilled clinical practice have physiotherapy evidence as a safe, effective and low-cost management approach for low back pain. PhysioWorks' physiotherapists are highly skilled. They are well respected to assess, diagnose, and successfully treat patients with low back pain from musculoskeletal dysfunction. Our injury management involves not only 'joint manipulation' like some other health practitioners, but also less forceful but equally effective passive examination and treatment techniques, effective therapeutic exercise (strengthening and stretching) and vital advice on posture, lifting and movement pattern abnormalities. In other words, your physiotherapist will fix the immediate problem and then help you to stop it coming back using a multitude of techniques and skill.

Evidence-Based Physiotherapy for Low Back Pain

There has been substantial research undertaken by physiotherapists investigating the techniques used. This research has been conducted according to stringent research guidelines. Unlike some alternative back pain remedies, physiotherapists base their treatment protocols on scientific research evidence. Based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA), with assistance from the Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists Association (MPA), has developed a recommendation for the successful treatment of low back pain.

Low Back Pain - Acute (less than 3 months)

There is considerable evidence to support that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) including passive mobilisation and manipulation, McKenzie therapy and the encouragement of early active movement, rather than bed rest, is effective in the short-term management of low back pain. SMT provides a better short-term improvement in both pain and the return to normal activity levels than the comparison regimens of traction, massage, short-wave diathermy and epidural injections. Compared to placebo or other conservative treatment, a recent meta-analysis reports twelve out of sixteen trials favourable for SMT.

Chronic Low Back Pain - Greater than 3 months

There is strong evidence to support that exercise programs result in a faster return to work rate, reduced absenteeism, and disability than control groups. Your PhysioWorks' physios possess the necessary skills and education to individually assess each low back pain candidate and then appropriately design, prescribe, supervise and progress your successful low back pain exercise program. Currently, physiotherapists are pioneering research investigations into the mechanisms contributing to chronic and recurrent low back pain. The evidence to support their efficacy is continually increasing. The spinal manipulative techniques (SMT) has been strongly shown to be more effective management of chronic low back pain than bed rest, pain killers and massage, with six out of eight trials supporting this evidence. More importantly, the combination of SMT and specific exercises has increasing support in managing low back pain. Your PhysioWorks physio has the necessary skill and knowledge to provide you with optimal low back pain care.

Real-Time Ultrasound-Guided Treatment

The best way to activate the correct core stability muscles is to see them working on an ultrasound scan. Yes, it's just like seeing an unborn baby. We now have this fantastic technology at several of our PhysioWorks clinics.

Electrical Stimulation

There is no harm in applying a home TENS unit to minimise pain while strengthening the muscles supporting your spine.

What are the Benefits of Good Posture?

good-posture-sitting

Good Posture:

  • Keeps your bones and joints in the correct alignment.
  • Helps to decrease the abnormal wearing of joint surfaces.
  • Decreases the stress on the ligaments holding the joints of the spine together.
  • Prevents the spine from becoming fixed in abnormal positions.
  • Prevents muscle fatigue.
  • Prevents any backache and muscular pain.
  • Contributes to a competent and confident appearance.

To Achieve Good Posture You Will Require the Following:

  • Good muscle flexibility
  • Normal motion in the joints
  • Strong postural muscles
  • A balance of muscles on both sides of the spine
  • Awareness of your posture, plus knowledge of proper postural position, which leads to conscious correction.
Practise the correct posture for standing, sitting, and lying down (as described below) to gradually replace your old position.

What is Good Posture?

Standing with the good posture looks and feels fantastic, plus it's very healthy for your joints, muscles, bones, blood circulation and most importantly, your self-esteem. That's why proud and confident people stand tall with excellent posture. It's a habit! How you hold your body in space is your posture. Your posture is a direct result of the postural habits that you commonly exhibit. You can choose to hold good posture or poor posture. Gravity is your worst enemy while standing or sitting. You could also refer to this as your spinal posture, back or neck posture. The good news for you is that you can quite easily change your postural habits and train your body to sit, stand, walk, and even rest in great postures. Good posture also places the least strain upon your supporting muscles and ligaments. But, no one posture is good to maintain all day. As a human, you were designed to move from posture to posture to avoid muscle fatigue and abnormal sustained tissue loading. This means that your best posture is your next posture!

Benefits of Good Posture

Good posture:
  • Prevents postural muscle fatigue.
  • Correctly aligns your joints and bones to encourage efficient muscle activity.
  • Helps minimalise joint stress.
  • Avoids passive ligament overload.
  • Prevents backache, neckache and muscular pain.
  • Contributes to your enhanced confidence and a good appearance!
Standing comfortably with good posture should feel natural and energy efficient. Bad postural habits can cause a few muscular aches and pains for a few days during the early transition (posture habit change) phase. You may experience temporary joint or muscle discomfort or fatigue as your joints realign, ligaments stretch and postural muscles start working. The good news is that if you keep at maintaining a good posture your body will quickly adapt and you'll feel more comfortable and strong in your new normal posture. Plus... the up side is that not only will you be less likely to suffer pain, you'll look confident and feel fantastic too!

How to Improve Your Standing Posture:

The number one tip to achieve a great standing posture is to simply"stand tall"! All the muscles that you need to push you taller are the same ones that improve your posture.
  • Stand tall!
  • Extend your head directly up (think balloon lifting your head with a string in the top of your scull) - but keep your chin tucked in. Avoid tilting your head forward, backward or sideways.
  • Your earlobes will line up with the middle of your shoulders.
  • Keep your shoulders back, your knees straight and your back straight.
  • Let arms hang naturally down the sides of the body
  • Lightly draw in your core stomach muscles. Avoid tilting your pelvis forward.
  • Avoid locking the knees
  • Ensure your feet arches are in a neutral (not flat) position.
  • Stand with weight over the the centre of your feet.
  • Stand with your feet slightly apart (shoulder-width).
  • When standing for a sustained periods, shift your weight from one foot to the other, or stand in walk stand and rock your weight from your front to back foot.

How to Quickly Check Your Standing Posture

Stand against a wall with shoulders and bottom touching wall. The rear of your head should lightly touch the wall.

How to Correct Your Posture?

If you experience discomfort in the above test and you can't easily correct your posture, you may have some restriction of joint, ligament or muscular movement. All of these problems can be quickly assessed and quickly improved by your physiotherapist. Please consult them for advice. Having difficulty maintaining a normal upright posture? You are probably suffering from reduced muscle endurance or strength. But these can both be easily improved with some practice of the right exercises. Your physiotherapist is an expert in prescribing the best postural exercises for you in a stage-appropriate manner to help your improve your posture without causing unnecessary pain or injury. You physiotherapist may also advise a posture brace or prescribe some posture taping to assist you to quickly achieve and maintain a good posture. Contact your physiotherapist for posture advice specific to you and your needs.

What is the Best Standing Posture?

Standing with your best posture not only looks and feels fantastic, but it's also very healthy for you. Great posture is the best thing for your muscles, joints, bones, blood circulation and most importantly, your self-esteem. That's why proud and confident people stand tall with excellent posture. It's a successful habit! Good posture also places the least strain upon your supporting muscles and ligaments. How you hold your body in space is your posture. Your everyday posture is a direct result of the everyday postural habits. You can choose to hold good posture or poor posture. The constant compressive weight of gravity is your worst enemy while standing or sitting. You could also refer to this as your spinal posture, back or neck posture. It's actually quite easy to improve your postural habits. But it is a habit and researchers suggest that it takes 10000 attempts to create a habit. That's a good or a bad habit! Why not start the new you with a proud and posture perfect body today?

What is Your Best Posture?

Humans were always designed to move and be versatile. You were designed to move from posture to posture to avoid muscle fatigue and abnormal sustained tissue loading. When we were hunters and gatherers it was easy. But, with specialised jobs and postures, we tend to become static for too long these days and that causes postural fatigue, which leads to posture failure. This means that your best posture is your next posture! 

Benefits of Good Posture

Good posture:
  • Prevents postural muscle fatigue.
  • Correctly aligns your joints and bones to encourage efficient muscle activity.
  • Help minimalise joint stress.
  • Avoids passive ligament overload.
  • Prevents a backache, neckache and muscular pain.
  • Contributes to your enhanced self-esteem!
Your ideal standing posture should be comfortable, easily attained and maintained. Your best posture should feel natural and be energy efficient. Bad postural habits can cause a few muscular aches and pains for a few days during the early transition (posture habit change) phase. During this period you can experience some temporary joint or muscle discomfort. These discomforts are related to mild joint adaptation as your joints realign, ligaments stretch and postural muscles start working. The good news is that if you keep at maintaining a good posture your body will quickly adapt and you'll feel more comfortable and strong in your new normal posture. Plus... the upside is that not only will you be less likely to suffer pain, you'll look confident and feel fantastic too!

How to Improve Your Standing Posture:

If I had to tell you one "switch" tip, it is simply to "stand tall" whenever you think about it. The muscles that you use to stand taller are exactly the same muscles that improve your posture.
  • Stand tall!
  • Think tall neck (ballerina or model style)- but keep your chin tucked in. Avoid tilting your head forward, backward or sideways.
  • Your earlobes will line up with the middle of your shoulders.
  • Keep your shoulders back, your knees straight and your back straight.
  • Let arms hang naturally down the sides of the body
  • Lightly draw in your core stomach muscles. Avoid tilting your pelvis forward.
  • Avoid locking the knees
  • Ensure your feet arches are in a neutral (not flat) position.
  • Stand with weight over the centre of your feet.
  • Stand with your feet slightly apart (shoulder-width).
  • Shift your weight from one foot to the other when standing for a sustained periods. Alternatively, stand in a walk-stand and rock your weight from your front to back foot.

How to Quickly Check Your Standing Posture

Stand against a wall with shoulders and bottom touching the wall. The back of your head should lightly touch the wall. If you can't do this without pain or strain, you may have some restriction of some spinal joints, ligament or some muscle tightness. All of these problems can be quickly assessed and quickly improved by your physiotherapist with some joint mobilisations, stretches, massage and/or strengthening exercises. Please consult your physiotherapist for specific advice regarding your posture.

Posture Fatigue?

Having difficulty maintaining your normal upright posture? You are probably suffering from reduced muscle endurance or strength. Postural muscle fatigue can be improved quite easily with repetitive contraction and periodic posture breaks. This will help to strengthen and improve your postural muscle endurance. Your physiotherapist is a professional in prescribing the best postural exercises for you in a stage-appropriate manner.  They may consider temporarily prescribing you with a posture brace or prescribe some posture taping to assist you to transition, achieve and maintain the best posture for you.
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