Leg Pain

Leg Pain & Injury

Article by John Miller

Areas of Leg Pain

Leg pain and injury are widespread. Most leg pain can occur as a result of sports injuries, work injuries or simply everyday use. Alternatively, leg pain can be referred from your lower back joints. Sciatica is a well-known source of referred leg pain. Leg pain can also be caused by blood clots (DVT’s), varicose veins or poor circulation.

How Do You Get Rid of Pain in the Leg?

It is important to make an accurate diagnosis of the cause of your leg pain or injury so that appropriate treatment can be directed at the cause. Your physiotherapist optimally treats musculoskeletal and sports injuries. If surgery is required, your doctor or physiotherapist may recommend that you seek the advice of an orthopaedic surgeon.

Referred pain from your lower back (e.g. sciatica) is also successfully treated by your trusted spinal healthcare practitioner, e.g. physiotherapist. A spinal surgeon assessment may be required to resolve your leg pain in a small percentage of patients.

Blood clots and vascular disorders may require the care of your doctor or a vascular surgeon. Untreated blood clots and DVT’s can have serious adverse health outcomes, including strokes or death. Prompt medical attention is strongly recommended.

Please do not delay consulting your doctor or physiotherapist if you experience leg pain. Some leg conditions can take many months or even years to heal when the diagnosis is incorrect, or treatment is neglected early.

Common Causes of Leg Pain

By Structure

Common Ankle Injuries

ankle pain

Sprained Ankles

The most common ankle injury is a sprained ankle, but ankle pain can have numerous sources.

Ankle Fractures

An ankle fracture occurs when there is a break in one or more of the bones. The most common ankle fractures are avulsion fractures of your distal fibula, which can be a side effect of an ankle sprain. All suspected fractures require medical investigation and professional management by your health professional to avoid long-term foot and ankle issues. If your healthcare professional suspects an ankle fracture, you will be referred for at least an X-ray and potentially an Orthopaedic Surgeon.

Ankle Tendinopathies

While muscle strains are more common in your legs, there are essential muscles that converge into tendons that wrap around your ankle to stabilise your ankle and foot to protect them from sprains and allow you to walk and run. These muscles and their tendon vitally provide you with a normal foot arch and avoid flat feet. Your muscles or tendons can become injured or inflamed as a result of overuse or trauma. The inflammation is called tendonitis. They can also tear, completely rupture, or sublux out of place. Medically tendon injuries are known as tendinopathies, and at the ankle may include:

Ankle Arthritis

Your ankle pain and dysfunction can lead to degenerative conditions such as ankle osteoarthritis. While arthritis usually is a chronic deterioration of your ankle joint, it is crucial to slow ankle arthritis progression. Would you please seek the professional advice of your ankle and foot health practitioner, e.g. physiotherapist or podiatrist?

Biomechanical Conditions

Biomechanical disorders may result in foot deformation, painful weight-bearing and potentially nerve compression. In simple terms, this is where your foot and ankle do not have normal bone alignment and motion contr. Here are a few possible conditions related to poor ankle biomechanics.

Muscle Injuries

Nerve-Related Ankle Pain

Children & Youth Conditions

Systemic Conditions That May Cause Ankle Pain

Soft Tissue Inflammation

Other Useful Information

Common Causes - Knee Pain

Knee pain can have many origins from local injury, referred pain, biomechanical issues and systemic issues. While knee pain can appear simple to the untrained eye, a thorough assessment is often required to ascertain the origin of your symptoms. The good news is that once a definitive diagnosis is determined, most knee pain quickly resolves with the correct treatment and rehabilitation.

Knee Ligament Injuries

Knee Meniscus Injuries

Kneecap Pain

Knee Arthritis

Knee Tendon Injuries

Muscle Injuries

Knee Bursitis

Children’s Knee Conditions

Other Knee-Related Conditions

Knee Surgery

Knee FAQs

For specific information regarding your knee pain, please seek the assistance of a healthcare professional with a particular interest in knee condition, such as your knee physiotherapist.