FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions


Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy

physiotherapy_brisbane

Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists have expertise in the treatment of musculoskeletal (muscle and joint) conditions. Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy employs advanced clinical assessment and diagnosis methods. Musculoskeletal physiotherapists and have been trained in a broader range of treatment techniques and normally hold a Masters of Physiotherapy qualification.

Members of the Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists Australia (MPA) are world-leaders in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of muscle and joint problems, especially spinal conditions that commonly cause lower back pain and neck pain.

How Can Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Help You?

Your Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist can:

  • Totally relieve or reduce your pain.
  • Provide you with strategies to best manage your injury or condition.
  • Help you to recover quicker and hasten your return to your normal activities.
  • Improve your flexibility, muscle strength, quality of movement, proprioception and co-ordination.
  • Assist you to achieve exercise or functional goals.
  • Improve your fitness.
  • Help you to prevent future injury recurrences.
  • Prescribe exercises to do at home, work in the gym to enhance your recovery.

Women’s Health Physiotherapy incorporates the assessment and treatment of a large number of women-specific conditions including:  

Q: What Do You Need To Bring To Your Women's Health Appointment?

A: Please bring any information regarding your condition from your GP, medical specialists or other health care providers with you to your appointment. You will also need to arrive 10 minutes before your appointment to fill out some paperwork. Alternatively, we can email information to you before your appointment.

Q: What Do You Wear To Your Appointment?

A: Please wear clothing that you can move around freely in.

Q: Will the Information That You Provide During Your Appointment Remain Confidential?

A: Yes. All the information that you provide in your appointment will remain confidential, and your physiotherapist will only communicate with other healthcare providers involved in your care with your consent. We also conduct your appointment in individual rooms to ensure that what you say remains confidential. The one exception to this is cases of rectus diastasis, which we may treat in the general physiotherapy curtained consulting area unless otherwise requested.

Q: How Long Will Your Appointment Be?

A: The length of the appointment can vary depending on the condition that we treat. Please see the table below for further information. Your initial women's health appointment will normally take 1-hour. Mastitis and rectus diastasis appointments will normally take 30 to 40-minutes. For information specific to your needs, please call our receptionist.

Q: What Will Your Women's Health Physiotherapy Appointment Cost?

A: The cost of the session can vary depending on the condition that will be treating. Please call our reception staff at Sandgate (Ph: 3269 1122) or Ashgrove (Ph: 3366 4221) for further information.

Q: Is Your Women's Health Physiotherapy Appointment Claimable Under Private Health Insurance?

A: Yes. Please bring the private health insurance card with you to your appointment so we can process your claim on the spot.

Q: Is Your Appointment Covered Under An EPC/Medicare Referral?

A: Yes, we do accept GP referrals under EPC guidelines. However, but due to the extended time allocated by your women's health physiotherapist, there will be a gap payment to cover the total cost of your consultation after the Medicare rebate is applied. Please call our reception staff at Sandgate (Ph: 3269 1122) or Ashgrove (Ph: 3366 4221) for specific information.

When Should Diagnostic Tests Be Performed?

If your symptoms continue to persist despite treatment, it is appropriate to return to your physiotherapist or doctor for further evaluation. Other causes of pain should be considered, and perhaps X-rays or other studies (MRI, CT scan, bone scan, or pathology studies) may be needed to make an accurate diagnosis.

Knee Pain

Adolescent Knee

Ankle Injuries

Thigh & Hamstring Pain

Shin & Calf Pain

Foot Pain

Groin Pain

Hip Pain

Back Pain

Shoulder Pain

Muscle Pain

Neck Pain

Wrist / Hand Injuries

Common Adolescent Football Injuries

Knee Pain

Heel Pain

Football Injury Risk Screening

Injury Prevention Strategies

What is Physiotherapy Treatment?

Physiotherapists help people affected by illness, injury or disability through exercise, manual joint therapy, soft tissue techniques education and advice.  Physiotherapists maintain physical health, help patients to manage pain and prevent disease for people of all ages. Physiotherapists help to encourage pain-relief, injury recovery, enabling people to stay playing a sport, working or performing activities of daily living while assisting them to remain functionally independent.

There is a multitude of different physiotherapy treatment approaches.

Acute & Sub-Acute Injury Management

Hands-On Physiotherapy Techniques

physiotherapy treatment

Your physiotherapist's training includes hands-on physiotherapy techniques such as:

Your physiotherapist has skilled training. Physiotherapy techniques have expanded over the past few decades. They have researched, upskilled and educated themselves in a spectrum of allied health skills. These skills include techniques shared with other healthcare practitioners. Professions include exercise physiologists, remedial massage therapists, osteopaths, acupuncturists, kinesiologists, chiropractors and occupational therapists, just to name a few.

Physiotherapy Taping

Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled professional who utilises strapping and taping techniques to prevent and assist injuries or pain relief and function.

Alternatively, your physiotherapist may recommend a supportive brace.

Acupuncture and Dry Needling

Many physiotherapists have acquired additional training in the field of acupuncture and dry needling to assist pain relief and muscle function.

Physiotherapy Exercises

Physiotherapists have been trained in the use of exercise therapy to strengthen your muscles and improve your function. Physiotherapy exercises use evidence-based protocols where possible as an effective way that you can solve or prevent pain and injury. Your physiotherapist is highly-skilled in the prescription of the "best exercises" for you and the most appropriate "exercise dose" for you depending on your rehabilitation status. Your physiotherapist will incorporate essential components of pilates, yoga and exercise physiology to provide you with the best result. They may even use Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy so that you can watch your muscles contract on a screen as you correctly retrain them.

Biomechanical Analysis

Biomechanical assessment, observation and diagnostic skills are paramount to the best treatment. Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled health professional. They possess superb diagnostic skills to detect and ultimately avoid musculoskeletal and sports injuries. Poor technique or posture is one of the most common sources of a repeat injury.

Hydrotherapy

Aquatic water exercises are an effective method to provide low bodyweight exercises.

Sports Physiotherapy

Sports physio requires an extra level of knowledge and physiotherapy skill to assist injury recovery, prevent injury and improve performance. For the best advice, consult a Sports Physiotherapist.

Vestibular Physiotherapy

Women's Health

Women's Health Physiotherapy is a particular interest group of therapies.

Workplace Physiotherapy

Not only can your physiotherapist assist you in sport, but they can also help you at work. Ergonomics looks at the best postures and workstation set up for your body at work or home. Whether it be lifting technique improvement, education programs or workstation setups, your physiotherapist can help you.

Electrotherapy

Plus Much More

Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled body mechanic. A physiotherapist has particular interests in certain injuries or specific conditions. For advice regarding your individual problem, please contact your PhysioWorks team.

What If You Delay Treatment?

Research tells us that symptoms lasting longer than three months become habitual and are much harder to solve. This can lead to nastier conditions.  The sooner you get on top of your symptoms the better your outcome. All injuries are different and little variations can make a big improvement to your recovery rate.  Stiff joints or muscles may need some range of movement exercises. Other injuries may require massage or very specific strengthening exercises. Seek professional guidance promptly for your best outcome.

Are Standing Desks Beneficial?

Check out this TV interview with John Miller from PhysioWorks:

Pain

Put simply, pain is the built-in alarm that informs you something is wrong! Pain is your body's way of sending a warning to your brain. Your spinal cord and nerves provide the pathway for messages to travel to and from your brain and the other parts of your body. Pain travels along these nerve pathways as electrical signals to your brain for interpretation. Receptor nerve cells in and beneath your skin sense heat, cold, light, touch, pressure, and pain. You have thousands of these receptor cells. Most cells sense pain. When there is an injury to your body, these tiny cells send messages along nerves into your spinal cord and then up to your brain. In general, pain receptors are classified according to their location. Receptors that respond to injury or noxious stimuli are termed nociceptors and are sensitive to thermal (heat), electrical, mechanical, chemical and painful stimuli. Each nociceptor is connected to a nerve that transmits an electrical impulse along its length towards the spinal cord and then, ultimately your brain. It is your brain that informs you whether or not you are experiencing pain. Plus, your pain can plays tricks - especially when you suffer chronic pain.

Pain messages travel slower than other nerve stimulation

Nerves can also be categorised according to their diameter (width) and whether or not a myelin sheath is present. Three types of nerves are concerned with the transmission of pain: A beta fibres, which have a large diameter and are myelinated A delta fibres, which have a small diameter and also have myelinated sheaths. C fibres, which have small diameters and are non-myelinated (slowing their conduction rate) and are generally involved with the transmission of dull, aching sensations. Nerves with a large diameter conduct impulses faster than those with a small diameter. The presence of a myelin sheath also speeds up the nerve conduction rate. One method of easing your pain is to provide your nervous system with high speed "good feelings" such as rubbing your injured area. This is the same principle that a tens machine (pain relieving machines) utilises to provide pain relief.
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