Running Analysis

Running Analysis

Article by John Miller

Why is Running Analysis Important?

Assessing how you run is very important. Running analysis is aimed at identifying:

  • How do you actually run? eg technique, foot placement etc
  • Where you have a lack of movement? eg joint stiffness, muscle tightness
  • Where do you lack control? eg joint hypermobility, muscle weakness
  • What shoe type suits you best?
  • Whether an orthotic is appropriate for you?

Running physiotherapists are professionally trained to detect biomechanical faults which can predispose you to injury. Even better, they’ll start fixing the problems they identify straight away.

Biomechanical analysis can involve:

Common Running Injuries

Running is one of the easiest and most popular ways to stay fit. It is also one of the easiest ways to develop an injury. Running injuries are common and often affect the hips, knees, ankles, and feet of runners. The impact and stress of running are sometimes hard on the muscles and joints; especially if you ignore early injury signs.

runners-knee

Knee Pain

Children’s Knee Conditions

Shin Pain

Calf Pain

Foot Injuries

Muscle Injuries

Heel Injuries

posterior shin splints

Achilles and Foot Tendinopathies

Hip Joint Pain

Lateral Hip Pain

Adductor-related Groin Pain

Arthritis

Biomechanical Conditions

Thigh & Hamstring Pain

Bone Injuries

General Information

Muscle-related Injuries

Disc-related Injuries

Back Joint Injuries

Nerve-related Injuries

Pelvis-related Injuries

For more advice regarding your running assessment, please contact PhysioWorks.

Related Treatments

Acute Treatment

Performance & Prevention Strategies

Biomechanical Approach

Acute Injury Signs

Acute Injury Management.

Here are some warning signs that you have an injury. While some injuries are immediately evident, others can creep up slowly and progressively get worse. If you don't pay attention to both types of injuries, chronic problems can develop.

For detailed information on specific injuries, check out the injury by body part section.

Don't Ignore these Injury Warning Signs

Joint Pain

Joint pain, particularly in the knee, ankle, elbow, and wrist joints, should never be ignored. Because these joints are not covered by muscle, pain here is rarely of muscular origin. Joint pain that lasts more than 48 hours requires a professional diagnosis.

Tenderness

If you can elicit pain at a specific point in a bone, muscle, or joint, you may have a significant injury by pressing your finger into it. If the same spot on the other side of the body does not produce the same pain, you should probably see your health professional.  

Swelling

Nearly all sports or musculoskeletal injuries cause swelling. Swelling is usually quite obvious and can be seen, but occasionally you may feel as though something is swollen or "full" even though it looks normal. Swelling usually goes along with pain, redness and heat.

Reduced Range of Motion

If the swelling isn't obvious, you can usually find it by checking for a reduced range of motion in a joint. If there is significant swelling within a joint, you will lose range of motion. Compare one side of the body with the other to identify major differences. If there are any, you probably have an injury that needs attention.

Weakness

Compare sides for weakness by performing the same task. One way to tell is to lift the same weight with the right and left sides and look at the result. Or try to place body weight on one leg and then the other. A difference in your ability to support your weight is another suggestion of an injury that requires attention.

Immediate Injury Treatment: Step-by-Step Guidelines

  • Stop the activity immediately.
  • Wrap the injured part in a compression bandage.
  • Apply ice to the injured part (use a bag of crushed ice or a bag of frozen vegetables).
  • Elevate the injured part to reduce swelling.
  • Consult your health practitioner for a proper diagnosis of any serious injury.
  • Rehabilitate your injury under professional guidance.
  • Seek a second opinion if you are not improving.