Corked Thigh

Corked Thigh

 

Article by H.Giebeler, J.Dobrowolski

What is a Corked Thigh?

(Also known as: “Dead Leg”, Quadriceps Contusions, “Charleys Horse”)

A corked thigh is very common in contact sports. In simple terms, your thigh muscles are usually “kneed” by an opponent during a tackle or similar impact. You crush the muscle tissue against the underlying bone. The muscles’ effect causes significant bruising and bleeding, both intramuscularly and between the muscle and your femur (thigh bone).

Its damage can often be much more than you might expect for such a simple cause. Treat with respect.  If not treated correctly or if treated too aggressively, then myositis ossificans may result.

There are Two Types of Contusion

Intramuscular Contusion

An intramuscular contusion is a tearing of the muscle within the sheath that surrounds it. The initial bleeding may stop early (within hours) because of increased pressure within the tissue. However, the fluid is unable to escape the muscle sheath. The result is considerable loss of muscle function, power and pain, taking days or weeks to recover. You are not likely to see any bruising come out with this type – especially in the early stages. Physiotherapy and carefully performed massage therapy assist a speedy recovery. These interventions are essential to prevent functional morbidity related to the significant compression issues and myositis ossificans.

Intermuscular Contusion

An intermuscular contusion is a tearing of the muscle and part of the sheath surrounding it. Initial bleeding will take longer to stop if you fail to apply ice. However, recovery is often faster than intramuscular as the blood and fluids can flow away from the site of injury. You are more likely to see bruising come out with this one. These injuries respond very well to physiotherapy and massage.

What are the Symptoms of a Corked Thigh?

  • Pain after being whacked in the leg.
  • You might get swelling or bruising.
  • Restricted movement
  • Reduced power.

What Can the Athlete Do?

Seek medical attention immediately. R.I.C.E. (Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate.) Use crutches. Commence physiotherapy as soon as possible.

Corked Thigh Treatment?

Seek professional help quickly if you can. Otherwise, implement a RICE regime until professionally assessed.

After two to three days, check:

  • If the swelling has not gone, then you probably have an intramuscular injury.
  • If the bleeding has spread and caused bruising away from the injury site, you probably have an intermuscular injury.
  • If you are more able to contract the muscle, you probably have an intermuscular injury.
  • Can you feel a deformation of the muscle or a gap? If so, please seek a professional assessment.

The correct diagnosis is critical. If you try to exercise on a complete rupture or a bad intramuscular injury, you can inhibit healing, make things worse or cause permanent disability.

If you apply heat and massage in the early stages, then you could get myositis ossificans (or bone-forming within the muscle), then you are in trouble. Myositis ossificans can result in months or years away from your sport.

Contusions are Graded 1, 2 or 3 depending on the Severity.

Grade 1

What do you feel?

  • Tightness in the thigh.
  • Unable to walk properly.
  • Probably not much swelling.
  • Trying to straighten the knee against resistance probably won’t produce much pain.
  • Lying on front and bending the knee should allow you nearly a full range of motion.

Grade 2

What do you feel?

  • You probably cannot walk normally.
  • You may experience occasional sudden twinges of pain during activity.
  • Possible swelling.
  • Pressing it causes pain.
  • Straightening the knee against resistance causes pain.
  • Unable to fully bend the knee.

Grade 3

What do you feel?

  • You will be unable to walk properly without the aid of crutches.
  • You will be in severe pain.
  • You will have significant swelling appear immediately.
  • A static contraction will be painful and might produce a bulge in the muscle.
  • Expect to be out of competition for 3 to twelve weeks.

Seek the advice of your physiotherapist or sports doctor as soon as possible.

Article by P.Xu

As we slowly start getting into the cooler seasons, many people will begin to notice sore joints waking up in the morning, or that movement has become stiff, or even headaches increasing in frequency or severity. Why is this? It turns out that cold weather can have a significant impact on your body’s tissues. Notably, the connective tissue gives our muscles and joints the ability to move as they do, called elastin. As the name suggests, elastin is one of the critical components that provide our joints and muscles with the ability to bend, stretch, and move as they need to get you through the day.
Now, imagine putting a rubber band in the freezer for a few hours. You take it out and then stretch it as hard as you can without warming it up. It’s either not going to stretch as well as it should or break in two. Elastin shares these properties. Under cold temperatures, the tissue cannot stretch or bend as well as it is supposed to, causing stiffness or soreness. Coupled with a few other common changes in the cold, vasoconstriction causes a decrease in your blood circulation. Plus, the tendency to stay home and not move our body makes many of us unaccustomed to cooler temperatures feel the full brunt of these effects moving forward. The good news is, it’s a relatively easy fix. Stay warm. If you’re planning on exercising, make sure to perform a dynamic warm-up to decrease the risk of injury, rather than pushing a cold muscle past its limit (remember the rubber band). If a joint feels stiff in the morning, remedy this with a heat pack or a hot shower. If you suspect your headache cause is the cold, slap on a beanie. This head-warming has the added benefit of hiding a bad hair day. Another excellent fix is getting a massage. Soft tissue therapy such as massage excels at combating several things caused by the cold. The physical act of heating a muscle or joint with friction provides warmth to deep tissues that a heat pack may not reach, allowing the elastin to function as it should. Trigger point work into deep muscle fibres may also bring longer-lasting relief than superficial heat therapy or static stretching. If you’re prone to feeling the cold effects, massage therapy may be the fix that you have been looking for if you want to achieve long-lasting relief from stiff or sore joints and muscles this winter.

sports injury

Sports Injury Management

You probably already know that a sports injury can affect not only your performance but also your lifestyle. The latest research continues to change sports injury management considerably.  Our challenge is to keep up to date with the latest research and put them to work for you.

How we treated you last year could vary significantly to how we treat you this year. The good news is that you can benefit considerably from our knowledge.

What Should You Do When You Suffer a Sports Injury?

Rest?

Rest from painful exercise or a movement is essential in the early injury stage. "No pain. No gain." does not apply in most cases.  The rule of thumb is - don't do anything that reproduces your pain for the initial two or three days.  After that, you need to get it moving, or other problems will develop.

Ice or Heat?

We usually recommend avoiding heat (and heat rubs) in the first 48 hours of injury. The heat encourages bleeding, which could be detrimental if used too early. In traumatic injuries, such as ligament sprains, muscle tears or bruising, ice should help reduce your pain and swelling.

Once the "heat" has come out of your injury, you can use heat packs. We recommend 20-minute applications a few times a day to increase the blood flow and hasten your healing rate. The heat will also help your muscles relax and ease your pain. If you're not sure what to do, please call us to discuss your situation specifically.

Should You Use a Compressive Bandage?

Yes. A compressive bandage will help to control swelling and bleeding in the first few days.  In most cases, the compressive dressing will also help support the injury as you lay down the new scar tissue. This early healing should help to reduce your pain. Some injuries will benefit from more rigid support such as a brace or strapping tape. Please ask us if you are uncertain about what to do next.

Elevation?

Gravity will encourage swelling to settle at the lowest point.  Elevation of an injury in the first few days is beneficial, especially for ankle or hand injuries.  Think where your damage is and where your heart is. Try to rest your injury above your heart.

What Medication Should You Use?

Your Doctor or Pharmacist may recommend pain killers or an anti-inflammatory drug. It is best to seek their professional advice as certain medications can interfere with other health conditions, especially asthmatics.

When Should You Commence Physio?

In most cases, "the early bird gets the worm".  Researchers have found that the intervention of physiotherapy treatment within a few days has many benefits.  These include:

  • Relieving your pain quicker via joint mobility techniques, massage and electrotherapy
  • Improving your scar tissue using techniques to guide the direction it forms
  • Getting you back to sport or work quicker through faster healing rates
  • Loosening or strengthening of your injured region with individually prescribed exercises
  • Improving your performance when you return to sport - we'll detect and help you correct any biomechanical faults that may affect your technique or predispose you to injury.

What If You Do Nothing?

Research tells us that injuries left untreated take longer to heal and have lingering pain.  They are also more likely to recur and leave you with either joint stiffness or muscle weakness. It's important to remember that symptoms lasting longer than three months become habitual and are much harder to solve.  The sooner you get on top of your symptoms, the better your outcome.

What About Arthritis?

Previously injured joints can prematurely become arthritic through neglect. Generally, there are four main reasons why you develop arthritis:

  • An inappropriately treated previous injury (e.g. old joint or ligament sprains)
  • Poor joint positioning (biomechanical faults)
  • Stiff joints (lack of movement diminishes joint nutrition)
  • Loose joints (excessive sloppiness causes joint damage through poor control)

What About Your Return to Sport?

Your physiotherapist will guide you safely back to the level of sport at which you wish to participate.  If you need guidance, ask us.

What If You Need Surgery or X-rays?

Not only will your physio diagnose your sports injury and give you the "peace of mind" associated, but they'll also refer you elsewhere if that's what's best for you. Think about it. You could be suffering needlessly from a sports injury.  Please use our advice to guide you out of pain quicker. And for a lot longer.

If you have any questions regarding your sports injury (or any other condition), please contact your physiotherapist to discuss. You'll find our friendly staff happy to point you in the right direction.

Acute Sports Injury Clinic

How to Best Care for Your Sports Injury?

There is never an excellent time for an injury. But we do know that most sports injuries occur over the weekend! That's why at PhysioWorks, we have established an Acute Sports Injury Clinic at a selection of our clinics on a Monday and Tuesday.

PhysioWorks has established an Acute Sports Injury Clinic at our Ashgrove, Clayfield and Sandgate practices to assist with the early assessment and management of acutely injured sports injuries.

The acute sports injury consultation fee is significantly lower than a routine assessment and treatment consultation. In most cases, your private health will cover the full cost of your full acute injury physio assessment fee.

Why Use an Acute Sports Injury Clinic?

Your Acute Sports Injury Assessment Consultation allows us to provide you with:

  • A quick and accurate diagnosis. One of our Sports Physiotherapist's or an experienced sports injury-focused Physiotherapist will confidently guide your new injury management.
  • Early acute sports injury care, professional advice and education. What to do this week?
  • Fast referral for X-rays, ultrasound or MRI scans to confirm your diagnosis.
  • Prompt referral to Sports Physicians, GPs or Surgeons with whom we work if required.
  • Immediate supply of walking boots, braces and rental crutches if needed.
  • Low-cost professional service.

More Information

For more friendly advice or guidance, please call your nearest clinic to discuss your specific needs.

Book Online Now! 24-Hours

Ashgrove Ph 3366 4221     Clayfield Ph 3862 4544     Sandgate Ph 3269 1122

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