FAQs

FAQs

Common FAQs


Elbow Pain

Please visit the links below for some of the more common sources of elbow pain.

Elbow-related Arm Pain

Neck-related Arm Pain

Muscle-related Arm Pain

Other Sources of Arm Pain

Common Treatments For Elbow Pain

With accurate assessment and early treatment, most elbow pain responds extremely quickly to physiotherapy that will allow you to quickly resume pain-free and normal activities of daily living. Some conditions may require diagnostic investigations such as X-rays, ultrasound, MRI or CT scan. Fractures, dislocations and some severe or chronic injuries may require surgical opinion and/or intervention Please ask your physiotherapist for their professional treatment advice.

Common Shoulder Pain & Injury Conditions

Rotator Cuff

Adhesive Capsulitis

Shoulder Bursitis

Shoulder Instability

Acromioclavicular Joint

Bone Injuries

Post-Operative Physiotherapy

Muscle Conditions

Systemic Conditions

Referred Pain

Shoulder Treatment

Researchers have discovered that managing your shoulder injury with physiotherapy is usually successful. Typically, you have two options: non-operative or a surgical approach. Your condition will dictate which option is best for you at this time. Non-operative care is conservative rehabilitation.

If shoulder surgery is required, then your physiotherapist may undertake:

Pre-operative rehabilitation  - to either trial a non-operative/conservative treatment approach or to condition and prepare your shoulder and body for a surgical procedure.

Post-operative physiotherapy - to safely and methodically regain your normal range of movement, strength, speed and function.

PhysioWorks physiotherapists have a special interest and an excellent working relationship with leading shoulder surgeons. Our physiotherapy team provide you with both conservative and post-operative shoulder rehabilitation options. We aim for you attaining the best possible outcome for your shoulder injury.

For specific information regarding your shoulder, please consult your trusted shoulder physiotherapist.

Common Foot Pain Causes

Foot Injuries

Tendon Injuries

Bone Injuries

Traumatic Ankle Ligament Injuries

Degenerative Conditions

Soft Tissue Inflammation

Biomechanical Conditions

Nerve-Related Sources

Muscle Injuries

Systemic Conditions

General Information

Common Treatments For Foot Pain

With accurate assessment and early treatment, most foot pain responds extremely quickly to physiotherapy allowing you to quickly resume pain-free and normal activities of daily living. Please ask your physiotherapist for their professional treatment advice.

Acute Treatment

Subacute Treatment Options

Other Treatment Options

Balance Improvement

Common Ankle Injuries

ankle pain
Sprained Ankles

The most common ankle injury is a sprained ankle, but ankle pain can have numerous sources.

Ankle pain that results from a traumatic injury is often a sports-related injury. But you don't necessarily have to be an athlete or even a social sportsperson to twist your ankle.

Something as simple as walking on an uneven footpath can cause a rolled ankle, resulting in an ankle sprain. Ankle injuries can potentially occur at any age. Thousands of people sprain their ankle every day around the world. Just while you've been reading this article, a few hundred people have sprained their ankle. While ankle pain can result from many ankle and foot injuries, the most common ankle injuries are sprains (low and high ankle), which involve ligaments and bones in the ankle. But you can also fracture a bone, tear muscles or over-stress a tendon when you sprain your ankle.

High ankle sprains are generally a more significant injury. These injuries require thorough assessment and treatment to avoid long-term ankle arthritis. If you can't perform a single-leg calf raise within a few days, please seek an early professional ankle assessment.

Related links:

Ankle Fractures

An ankle fracture occurs when there is a break in one or more of the bones. The most common ankle fractures are avulsion fractures of your distal fibula, which can be a side effect of an ankle sprain. These are generally less troublesome than if you experience a talar dome fracture with your actual ankle joint. Potts fracture is a significant fracture of your tibia and fibula simultaneously. All suspected fractures require medical investigation and professional management by your health professional to avoid long-term foot and ankle issues. If your healthcare professional suspects an ankle fracture, you will be referred for at least an X-ray and potentially an Orthopaedic Surgeon. Related links:

Ankle Tendinopathies

While muscle strains are more common in your legs, there are essential muscles that converge into tendons that wrap around your ankle to stabilise your ankle and foot to protect them from sprains and allow you to walk and run. These muscles and their tendon vitally provide you with a normal foot arch and avoid flat feet.

Your muscles or tendons can become injured or inflamed as a result of overuse or trauma. The inflammation is called tendonitis. They can also tear, completely rupture, or sublux out of place. Medically tendon injuries are known as tendinopathies, and at the ankle may include:

Ankle Arthritis

Your ankle pain and dysfunction can lead to degenerative conditions such as ankle osteoarthritis. While arthritis usually is a chronic deterioration of your ankle joint, it is crucial to slow ankle arthritis progression. Please seek the professional advice of your ankle and foot health practitioner, e.g. physiotherapist or podiatrist.

Biomechanical Conditions

Biomechanical disorders may result in foot deformation, painful weight-bearing and potentially nerve compression. In simple terms, this is where your foot and ankle do not have normal bone alignment and motion contr. Here are a few possible conditions related to poor ankle biomechanics.

Muscle Injuries

Nerve-Related Ankle Pain

Children & Youth Conditions

Systemic Conditions that may cause Ankle Pain

Soft Tissue Inflammation

Other Useful Information

Sources of Calf Pain

The most common sources of leg pain include a calf muscle strain (torn calf), Achilles tendinopathy and leg cramps.

calf injury

Other sources of calf pain can include the following:

Calf Muscle Strain

Other Muscular Conditions

Achilles Injuries

Shin Pain

Systemic Conditions

Neurological Conditions

What Causes TMJ?

TMJ dysfunction is considered a multifaceted musculoskeletal disorder. The most common causes of TMD include:
  • Masticatory muscle dysfunction,
  • Derangement/displacement of TMJ articular disc
  • Bruxism: nocturnal grinding of teeth leads to increased pressure in TMJ and asymmetrical movement.
  • Occlusal Problems: Poor bite, Asymmetrical or Retrognathic (underbite, overbite) .
Contributory factors include:
    • Mandibular malalignment is secondary to an occlusal appliance or orthodontic treatment.
    • Removal of wisdom teeth,
    • Prolonged mouth opening, e.g. dental procedure,
    • Poor cervical posture,
    • Myofascial pain,
  • Neuropsychological factors,
  • Stress and
  • Whiplash and other less common causes include trauma (e.g., blow to the chin), infection, polyarthritic conditions, tumours, and anatomical abnormalities.

TMJ Dysfunction Classifications

What Causes TMJ The common presentations of TMJ dysfunction classify into three clinical diagnostic groups:
  • Jaw muscle disorder characterised by painful movement.
  • Articular disc displacement.
  • Arthralgia or arthritis.
(Dworkin SF, LeResche L., 1992)

What is the Cause of Jaw Clicking?

Clicking jaw is a sign of articular disc displacement, which is commonly treated by a TMJ physiotherapist. Clicking can occur during jaw opening, closing or both directions. Please seek the clinical assessment of TMJ physiotherapist for a specific diagnosis and treatment plan.

Common Sources of TMJ Dysfunction or Jaw Pain

TMJ or jaw pain can occur as a result of various multi-factorial reasons. Most TMJ dysfunction resulting in jaw pain or clicking jaw results from two leading causes: jaw opening or closing.

TMJ Dysfunction - Abnormal Opening

Most TMJ dysfunction that occurs results in an inability to open your jaw fully or symmetrically. Luckily nearly all opening dysfunctions respond exceptionally quickly and favourably to physiotherapy assessment and intervention since teeth occlusion is not an issue.

TMJ Dysfunction - Abnormal Closing

Closing dysfunction can be due to both a teeth occlusion and an inability of the TMJ to close normally. If the problem is simply a stiff joint or poor muscle timing, then physiotherapy treatment will be very successful. However, if teeth occlusion issues exist, then you will be referred to a dental surgeon for a bite occlusion assessment.

Potential Causes of TMJ or Jaw Pain

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