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What is Physiotherapy Treatment?

Physiotherapists help people affected by illness, injury or disability through exercise, manual joint therapy, soft tissue techniques, education and advice.  Physiotherapists maintain physical health, allow patients to manage pain and prevent disease for people of all ages. Physiotherapists help encourage pain relief, injury recovery, enabling people to stay playing a sport, working or performing daily living activities while assisting them to remain functionally independent.

There is a multitude of different physiotherapy treatment approaches.

Acute & Sub-Acute Injury Management

physiotherapy treatment

Hands-On Physiotherapy Techniques

Your physiotherapist's training includes hands-on physiotherapy techniques such as:

Your physiotherapist has skilled training. Physiotherapy techniques have expanded over the past few decades. They have researched, upskilled and educated themselves in a spectrum of allied health skills. These skills include techniques shared with other healthcare practitioners. Professions include exercise physiologists, remedial massage therapists, osteopaths, acupuncturists, kinesiologists, chiropractors and occupational therapists, to name a few.

Physiotherapy Taping

Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled professional who utilises strapping and taping techniques to prevent and assist injuries or pain relief and function.

Alternatively, your physiotherapist may recommend a supportive brace.

Acupuncture and Dry Needling

Many physiotherapists have acquired additional training in acupuncture and dry needling to assist pain relief and muscle function.

Physiotherapy Exercises

Physiotherapists have been trained in the use of exercise therapy to strengthen your muscles and improve your function. Physiotherapy exercises use evidence-based protocols where possible as an effective way that you can solve or prevent pain and injury. Your physiotherapist is highly skilled in prescribing the "best exercises" for you and the most appropriate "exercise dose" for you, depending on your rehabilitation status. Your physiotherapist will incorporate essential pilates, yoga and exercise physiology components to provide you with the best result. They may even use Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy so that you can watch your muscles contract on a screen as you correctly retrain them.

Biomechanical Analysis

Biomechanical assessment, observation and diagnostic skills are paramount to the best treatment. Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled health professional. They possess superb diagnostic skills to detect and ultimately avoid musculoskeletal and sports injuries. Poor technique or posture is one of the most common sources of a repeat injury.

Hydrotherapy

Aquatic water exercises are an effective method to provide low bodyweight exercises.

Sports Physiotherapy

Sports physio requires an extra level of knowledge and physiotherapy to assist injury recovery, prevent injury and improve performance. For the best advice, consult a Sports & Exercise Physiotherapist.

Vestibular Physiotherapy

Women's Health

Women's Health Physiotherapy is a particular interest group of therapies.

Workplace Physiotherapy

Not only can your physiotherapist assist you in sport, but they can also help you at work. Ergonomics looks at the best postures and workstations set up for your body at work or home. Whether it be lifting technique improvement, education programs or workstation setups, your physiotherapist can help you.

Electrotherapy

Plus Much More

Your physiotherapist is a highly skilled body mechanic. A physiotherapist has particular interests in certain injuries or specific conditions. For advice regarding your problem, please get in touch with your PhysioWorks team.

How to Sit Correctly

  • Sit up with your back straight and your shoulders back.
  • Your buttocks should touch the back of your chair.
  • All three standard S-shaped curves should be present while sitting.
  • You can use a small, rolled-up towel or a lumbar roll to help you maintain the standard curves in your back.

Here's how to find a good sitting position when you're not using a back support or lumbar roll:

  • Sit at the end of your chair and slouch completely
  • Draw yourself up and accentuate the curve of your back as far as possible.
  • Hold for a few seconds.
  • Release the position slightly (about 10 degrees), achieving a good sitting posture.
  • Distribute your body weight evenly on both hips.
  • Bend your knees at a right angle. Do not sit with your knees crossed. Keep your knees even with or slightly higher than your hips.
  • Keep your feet flat on the floor.
  • Try to avoid sitting in the same position for more than 30 minutes.
  • At work, adjust your chair height and workstation so you can sit up close to your work and tilt it up at you. Rest your elbows and arms on your chair or desk, keeping your shoulders relaxed.
  • When sitting in a chair that rolls and pivots, don't twist at the waist while sitting. Instead, turn your whole body.
  • When standing up from the sitting position, move to the front of the seat of your chair. Stand up by straightening your legs. Avoid bending forward at your waist. Immediately stretch your back by doing ten standing backbends.
  • It is okay to assume other sitting positions for short periods, but most of your sitting time should be upright with minimal stress on your spine.

What is the Correct Way to Sit While Driving?

  • Use a back support (lumbar roll) at the curve of your back. Your knees should be at the same level or higher than your hips.
  • Move the seat close to the steering wheel to support the curve of your back. The chair should be close enough to allow your knees to bend and your feet to reach the pedals.

More info:

Posture Correction

Standing Posture

Posture Braces

When Should You Commence Physiotherapy?

In severe cases, it is best to commence physiotherapy as soon as possible.  However, it does vary from case to case. Your physiotherapist has some nifty tricks to improve your pain straight away.

If you are not sure what to do, please call us for advice. We’ll happily guide you in your time of need. Often a bit of reassurance is all that you will need.

How Much Treatment Will You Need?

After assessing your injury, your physiotherapist will discuss the injury severity with you and estimate the number of treatments needed. No two injuries are ever the same.

Your treatment will include techniques and exercises to regain your:

  • joint, ligament and soft tissue mobility
  • muscle strength, power and speed
  • balance and proprioception
  • prevention tips
  • performance improvement.

What If You Delay Treatment?

Research tells us that symptoms lasting longer than three months become habitual and are much harder to solve. This can lead to nastier conditions.  The sooner you get on top of your symptoms the better your outcome.

All injuries are different and little variations can make a big improvement to your recovery rate.  Stiff joints or muscles may need some range of movement exercises. Other injuries may require massage or very specific strengthening exercises.

Seek professional guidance promptly for your best outcome.

Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy

What conditions are likely to be assisted by the use of real-time ultrasound physiotherapy?

Lower Back Pain

Ultrasound retraining of your Core Stability Muscles has fantastic benefits for low back pain sufferers. Researchers have investigated the benefits of ultrasound retraining since the 1990s. They have discovered that your chances of not experiencing another bout of low back pain (LBP) within 12 months are 4.4 times better if you have undertaken an ultrasound-guided exercise program: 70% vs 16%.

ultrasound-physiotherapy

Its effectiveness also lasts. After three years, you still have a 2 in 3 chance of not experiencing LBP if you did the exercises. Hides et al. (2001).

More info: Lower Back Pain

Sciatica

Ultrasound retraining of your Core Stability Muscles has fantastic benefits for sciatica sufferers. Since the vast majority of sciatica is caused by sciatic nerve pinching in the low lumbar spine, a treatment that helps your back will almost always alleviate sciatica.

More info: Sciatica

SIJ Dysfunction

The Sacroiliac Joint (SIJ) should be a reasonably stiff or rigid link between the pelvic bones. In some people, the SIJ has too much-uncontrolled motion due to trauma or just extra mobility. This new motion allows the joint to adopt an unusual position which may result in pain.

Through their attachments to the iliac bones, the transversus abdominis (TA) and oblique abdominals help the pelvis's closure and improve the sacroiliac joints' position, control, and stability.

Researchers have discovered that the contraction of the TA muscle significantly stiffens and supports the sacroiliac joint. This improvement is more significant than that caused by an abdominal bracing action using all the lateral abdominal muscles. (Richardson et al. 2002)

More info: SIJ Pain

Pelvic Floor Retraining

Strong pelvic floor muscles are essential for men and women. Women have been encouraged to exercise their pelvic floor muscles for decades, but now we understand that it is just as vital for men. Research has found that a durable pelvic floor improves:

  • incontinence (urine dribbling)
  • post-childbirth (women)
  • post-prostatectomy (men)
  • erectile dysfunction (Uni of Bristol study, 2004)
  • sexual sensations and enjoyment (Impotence Association, UK)

More info: Pelvic floor

Pelvis Instability

Some people are born a little more flexible than the rest of us. Usually, these people have poor muscle tone in their deep, stabilising muscles. The transversus abdominis is the most important muscle that holds the two halves of the pelvis together. Core stability retraining will improve your deep core muscle control, which dynamically stabilises your pelvis, SIJ and lumbar spine.

More info: Pelvic Instability

Pregnancy or Post-Childbirth Back Pain

Carrying a child is a physically demanding task. The baby's weight places continual pressure on the pelvic floor muscles and stretches the lower abdominal muscles.

The trauma of birth involves further stretching of the pelvic floor muscles and sometimes tearing. Hence, the pelvic floor muscles and the transversus abdominis become weak, stretched and inhibited. Along with this, a hormone called "relaxin" is released through your body during the months before and post-delivery. Relaxin makes the pelvic ligaments soften to enable the pelvis joints to stretch for delivery. This elasticity means that the transversus muscle has to work even harder to stabilise the pelvis and lumbar spine.

The good news is that Ultrasound Retraining is very safe for the unborn child. The ultrasound equipment is the same as that used by your Obstetrician for routine pregnancy scans.

Caesarian births have additional complications due to the cutting of muscle layers and, in some cases, nerves. We highly recommend US retraining following a Caesarian delivery.

More info: Pregnancy Back Pain

Post Abdominal Surgery

Abdominal and pelvic surgery involves cutting through the muscle layers. Along with post-operative pain, muscle trauma changes the core stability muscles' ability to work efficiently. As with other muscle cuts, your Transversus Abdominis, in particular, needs to be strengthened post-operatively. Otherwise, it will almost certainly remain permanently weak.

The lower part of the transversus muscle fibres is separated (such as in appendix removal or caesarean births). Because of this, you need to retrain the muscle to learn how to use it again correctly.

Pre-Pilates, Yoga, Gym & Exercise Programs

Exercise programs that aim to develop your core strength can often do just the opposite. The most common reason for injury and back pain is the incorrect timing of muscle recruitment. Pilates, Yoga, gym strengthening, and other exercise forms place high demands on your core stability system. Suppose the core muscle recruitment order is abnormal, your chance of injury increases in proportion with the exercise difficulty.

Research has identified that the order of core muscle recruitment is the most critical factor in preventing or resolving pain.

Remember, if you build a skyscraper on a weak foundation, it will eventually topple. The same goes for your core stability muscles. Recruit the deeper muscles before your superficial layers, just like adding floors to a sturdy skyscraper and your back will be healthy and pain-free forever.

More info: Pilates

"Pot Belly" Syndrome

"Pot Belly" - or whatever you wish to call it, is a cosmetic problem related to your lower stomach muscles.

Some people have lax lower stomach muscles. No matter how hard you pull in your tummy, the lower part doesn't seem to pull in. Ultrasound retraining is a valid alternative to cosmetic surgery.

The problem is that the transversus abdominis muscle has stopped working effectively, and the upper abdominal muscles dominate. Hence as you attempt to pull in your stomach muscles, the upper stomach muscles suck in, but the lower part doesn't. The result is a "Pot Belly"."Pot Belly" is a common problem post-pregnancy.

With Ultrasound Retraining, you can learn to draw in your lower tummy muscles and solve your "Pot Belly" forever!

More Info

Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy

What Conditions Are Assisted By Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy?

Is Ultrasound Physiotherapy The Whole Solution For Lower Back Pain?

Real-Time Ultrasound Physiotherapy Clinics - Brisbane

Lower Back Pain

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